wavyarms (wavyarms) wrote in bible_babble,
wavyarms
wavyarms
bible_babble

introductions

Because many of you may no longer be reading the comments on the last post, I want to repeat a request that nupuppylover made in a comment to the last entry. Could we all introduce ourselves and say what our religious backgrounds are? I'll get things rolling in the first comment!
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I was raised Unitarian Universalist, but I stopped attending church regularly when I went to college. I am an atheist, and therefore am approaching the Bible from an outside perspective.
I do now - that's splendid!
Hi all! I'm Jewish. I occupy the space on the Venn diagram where Reform Judaism (the denomination I spent high school in, and the denomination to which my current shul belongs) and Renewal Judaism (the grassroots movement in which I am currently studying) overlap.

Darn, LJ ate my reply...

I'm a solitary neo-pagan who was raised without a specific religion, but in the culturally-established Christianity of the United States. (That is, I knew the story of Christmas, Easter, Adam and Eve, Satan and sin, etc. before I ever went to church.) I'm going to divinity school, so I can toss in occasional nuggets of academia. These may or may not be of any value.

I've read the Hebrew Bible, but not all of the New Testament.
Hi everyone,

Mostly ghosting, although if I ever come up with something that these wonderfully articulate people haven't already expressed ten times better than I could, I'll let you know :).

I'm born and raised Catholic, practicing weekly, mostly because of music and the community of being in a choir, not through scholarship. My mom is a liturgy director, though, so she often passes on interesting tidbits from her job and current masters program.

All in all, I'm a scientist, which is not incompatible with religion in my mind, but I'm not prone to examine myself too closely so I could be wrong.

I'm unclear what books, exactly, I've read of the Bible; I remember doing most of Genesis in high school (Catholic high school) and my Confirmation class read Revelation, but other than that I can't list what I have and haven't gotten through.
Lurk. I mean I'm lurking. Looks like I need to get to bed...
Like the poster above, I'm mostly lurking here.

I identify as an atheist, though I sould offer a bit more detail: I cannot state with certainty that gods do not exist (though I strongly doubt they do); whether they exist or not, however, I choose not to believe in any. It's just easier that way.

Much of my curiosity about the Bible comes from its history — how it was created and adapted, and how so many people over the centuries have [mis]interpreted it and used it to "justify" their own agendas and such. Also, Jesus was pretty cool.

I may not post very often, but I'm interested in reading what y'all say!
A few years ago I coined the term Jewish Atheist to describe my family's religious beliefs/leanings, and we've adopted that phrase ever since. I'm a product of a mixed marriage, but was raised Jewish, but in a mostly secular way. I've been an atheist, more or less, since my teen years.
Hello, all! Due to an overly hectic schedule, I hadn't joined this community until today, even though I've known about it since it was first invented, and I have yet to crack open my Bible (maybe tomorrow?). I was raised EXTREMELY Catholic (my mother is one of those "Catholic watchdogs" who owns a copy of the Code of Canon Law and who calls the bishop whenever she thinks the priest is doing something that's out of line with Rome) and continued to be pretty devout until college, when I turned into something of an agnostic. As a musician, I have served as organist and choir director for churches in a number of different denominations, and - although I don't consider myself to particularly be a Christian of any sort anymore - I have a great deal of affection for the Episcopal Church. (I worked for a WONDERFUL congregation when I loved in Pittsburgh; they have a great liturgical tradition and the best choirs of any denomination; they were cool enough to appoint a gay bishop; etc.) However, I'm currently of the opinion that no one religion has got things right... After all, all religions are organized by humans, and humans are incredibly fallible. How can we presume to say that we know who God (and I use the term "God" very loosely) is or what God wants? I think that most religions have glimpses of truth in them, but they all also each have their own problems. I could go on with my soapbox rant at much greater length, but by now you all have a good enough idea of where I'm coming from!
Greetings!
I signed onto this group when I heard that (a) several cool people I like were on it, and (b) there was talk of reviving it. In typical fashion, I have now posted to it, and am only now looking back over what's already there...

Anyhoo. I'm a dyed-in-the-wool Episcopalian (anyone here know what PK means?), and then made that worse by (a) being a lifelong choir brat, and (b) going into medieval studies. I'm politically liberal, but theologically rather conservative. (Even when I'm feeling agnostic: my attitude is sort of "If the basic doctrine's not true, what the hell's the point of everything else?")
I will try not to make fun of the Unitarians (too much). You are allowed to make fun of us, on the other hand. (Hey, Episcopalians do it all the time!)